Blackboard Still Rules the Day

LearnDash.com has an article about a 2012 survey on the penetration of learning management systems into the marketplace.  According to them Blackboard still rules with 74%, with Moodle being its closest competitor @42%.  Desire2Learn is a distant third with 14%.  [Please note that because schools have multiple LMSs, the numbers do not add up to 100%.]

Full post.

Podcast: Tom Vander Ark Discusses How Online Learning Is Shaping the Educational Landscape (10:33)

Vander Ark talks about some recent trends and his preferences for online learning.  He tends toward blended learning for most students.

The educational landscape is continually being changed by new innovations in online learning.  Online learning solutions provide access to high-quality course materials, which can be administrated in a cost-effective manner.

For school districts looking to embrace online learning, this new approach to learning also provides a method for offering blended classes and is ideal for advanced courses in STEM and foreign languages.  And it is a great way to leverage talented teachers, and to provide new career options for many of your teachers.

These are some of the key insights from a recent podcast interview with Tom Vander Ark, who is the author of Getting Smart: How Digital Learning is Changing the World.

As an advocate for innovations that customize and motivate learning and extend access, Tom is also the CEO of Getting Smart, a learning advocacy firm and is a partner in Learn Capital, an education venture capital firm investing in education technology startups.

“Course” versus “Learning Experience”

Inside Higher Ed Icon

by Carl Straumsheim @ Insider Higher Ed

Straumsheim has an interesting piece over at Inside Higher Ed about what to call MOOCs.  He quotes Harvard Faculty Director Robert A. Lue on the conversations they have had on campus about this change in online.  He points out that the traditional 90-minute lecture has not translated well to the online environment.  He says that faculty were encouraged to follow the Khan Academy model of breaking things up into modules that cover no more than one concept.  He added, “When those modules are freed from the time constraints of a semester or quarter, the end result bears only some resemblance to a course.”

“It really does reflect in my view a real sea change in how we’re thinking about education,” Lue said. “The word [course] is still meaningful, but I feel strongly that as a defining term, it is increasingly less defining of all the different options that we want to have.”

Lue compared the breakdown of courses into modules to textbooks and chapters. “It’s very hard to use a course in another course, while once you modularize into these more discrete learning experiences, it’s so much easier to share,” he said.

The rest of the article contains some interesting in sights into the changes going on in technology, MOOC partnerships, and the rethinking of content and its delivery.

Full post is here.
Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2013/10/28/online-course-providers-increasingly-using-term-learning-experience#ixzz2j80NMwe7
Inside Higher Ed

Webinar: Good for Students, Good for Faculty: The University of Washington Reviews the LMS

On November 6, 2013 from 1-2:00 PM EST, Casey Green–senior research consultant for Inside Higher Ed and founding director of The Campus Computing Project–will look at the process by which UW moved from three disjointed systems to selecting Canvas by Instructure as it only institutional LMS after a year long pilot.

Register Here.