2017 Babson Distance Education Enrollment Report

Babson Distance Education Enrollment Report

The Babson Distance Education Enrollment Report for 2017 was recently released.  This is a new iteration of the report, a series which has been around for a decade.  This new endeavor is a collaboration of a number of leaders in the space that have decided to join forces.  As the website says:

Realizing that we accomplish more together (and that we liked each other’s data wonk personalities), the three organizations partnered in 2017 to create the Digital Learning Compass. Our goal: To be the definitive source of information on the patterns and trends of U.S. postsecondary distance learning.

 

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Leaders In Online Education from New Online Survey

Chronicle of higher education logo

The Chronicle of Higher Education updated its 2012 statistics on online education providers.  Using information from the Digital Learning Compass: Digital Education Enrollment Report 2017, the chronicle states that over 6 million students, or nearly 30 of college students, took online distance education classes in 2015.  Only 5 percent of institutions account for nearly half of these students.  In fact, 50 institutions account for nearly 1.5 million students.  Private non-profits are going the fastest, while for-profit colleges have declines since 2012.

Top Online Schools 2015 with Growth from 2012

  • University of Phoenix: 162,003 (-94,343)
  • Liberty University: 72,519 (2,584)
  • Western Governors University: 41,369 (29,135)
  • Southern New Hampshire University: 56,371 (45,085)
  • Grand Canyon University: 44,006 (10,537

The University of Phoenix’s reduced numbers is in line with its announced plans to “shrink itself” though eliminating most of its associate degrees and closing more is its physical campuses.

The full Chronicle story is here.

 

Online Report Card: Tracking Online Education In the United States

Online Report Card Booklet Icon

The 2015 Survey of Online Learning conducted by Babson Survey Research Group has been released.  This is their 13th annual report on online learning.  This year’s survey and report was co-sponsored by the Online Learning Consortium (OLC), Pearson, StudyPortals, WCET, and Tyton Partners.  Babson’s reports have become known as the “leading barometer of online learning in the United States.” (Previous reports are available here for 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, and 2007)

The key findings of the report include: Continue reading

Grade Level: Tracking Online Education In the United States

Grade Level Booklet Icon

The 2014 Survey of Online Learning conducted by Babson Research Group, the Online Learning Consortium, Pearson, etc. was recently released.  One of the findings was that the number of higher education students who are taking at least one online course was up 3.7 percent over the previous year.  While that is slower growth than in the past, it still far exceeds the the overall growth rate of higher education in general.

The key findings are:

  • The year-to-year 3.7% increase in the number of distance education students is the lowest recorded over the 13 years of this report series.
  • Public and private nonprofit institutions recorded distance enrollment growth, but these were offset by a decrease among for-profit institutions.
  • The percent of academic leaders rating the learning outcomes in online education as the same or superior to those in face-to-face remained unchanged at 74.1%.
  • The proportion of chief academic leaders reporting online learning is critical to their long-term strategy reached a new high of 70.8%.
  • Only 28.0% of academic leaders say that their faculty accept the “value and legitimacy of online education.”
  • The adoption of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Course) is reaching a plateau, only 8.0% of higher education institutions currently offer one, another 5.6% report MOOCs are in the planning stages.
  • The proportion of academic leaders who believe that MOOCs represent a sustainable method for offering online courses dropped to 16.3%.

The press release is available here.

The infographic is available here.

The full report is available here: gradelevel

Grade Change: Tracking Online Education In the United States

Grade Change Booklet Icon

The 2013 survey of online education administered by the Babson Survey Research Group has just recently been released.  The survey was conducted in conjunction with the Online Consortium and Pearson.

The survey aimed to answer the following questions:

  • Is Online Learning Strategic?
  • Are Learning Outcomes in Online Comparable to Face-to-Face Learning?
  • How Many Students are Learning Online?
  • How are Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) faring?
  • And much more…

And had these key findings:

  • 7.1 million of higher education students are taking at least one online course.
  • The 6.1 % growth rate represents over 400,000 additional students taking at least one online course.
  • The percent of academic leaders rating the learning outcomes in online education as the same or superior to those as in face-to-face instruction, grew from 57% in 2003 to 74% in 2013.
  • The number of students taking at least one online course continued to grow at a rate far in excess of overall enrollments, but the rate was the lowest in a decade.

The full survey is available here.

Or, here: gradechange

 

Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United States

Changing Course Booklet Icon

The 2012 survey of online learning by the Babson Survey Group has recently been released.  The survey was conducted with the support of Sloan-C and Pearson.  The survey found that the number of students taking at least one online class has surpassed 6.7 million.  It also found that the adoption of Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs) is low with most institutions sitting on the sidelines.

According to the report online growth “remains extremely robust,” even in a time declining enrollments in higher education overall. With regards to MOOCs, they found, “Institutional opinions on MOOCs are mixed, with positive views of their ability to learn about online pedagogy and to attract new students, but concerns about whether they represent a sustainable method for offering courses.”

The key findings in the report are:

  • Over 6.7 million students were taking at least one online course during the fall 2011 term, an increase of 570,000 students over the previous year.
  • Thirty-two percent of higher education students now take at least one course online.
  • Only 2.6 percent of higher education institutions currently have a MOOC (Massive Open Online Course), another 9.4 percent report MOOCs are in the planning stages.
  • Academic leaders remain unconvinced that MOOCs represent a sustainable method for offering online courses, but do believe that they provide an important means for institutions to learn about online pedagogy.
  • Seventy-seven percent of academic leaders rate the learning outcomes in online education as the same or superior to those in face-to-face.
  • Only 30.2 percent of chief academic officers believe that their faculty accept the value and legitimacy of online education – a rate is lower than recorded in 2004.
  • The proportion of chief academic leaders that say that online learning is critical to their long-term strategy is at a new high of 69.1 percent.
  • A majority of chief academic officers at all types of institutions continue to believe that lower retention rates for online courses are a barrier to the wide-spread adoption of online education.

The report is availalbe here.

Or, here: changingcourse

Going the Distance: Online Education in the United States

Going the Distance

The 2011 annual suvey conducted by Babson Survey Research Group and the College Board is now available.  The report was produced in conjunction with Sloan-C, Kaplan Univeristy, Inside Higher Ed, and Pearson.

The survey shows that the growth rate in online enrollments is ten times that rate in higher education in general.  The key findings of the report are:

  • Over 6.1 million students were taking at least one online course during the fall 2010 term, an increase of 560,000 students over the previous year.
  • The 10% growth rate for online enrollments far exceeds the 2% growth in the overall higher education student population.
  • Thirty-one percent of higher education students now take at least one course online.
  • Reported year-to-year enrollment changes for fully online programs by discipline show most are growing.
  • Academic leaders believe that the level of student satisfaction is equivalent for online and face-to-face courses.
  • 65% of higher education institutions now say that online learning is a critical part of their long-term strategy.
  • There continues to be a consistent minority of academic leaders concerned that the quality of online instruction is not equal to courses delivered face-to-face.

The full report is available here.

Or, here: goingthedistance

Class Differences: Online Education in the United States 2010

Class Differences Booklet Icon

The 2010 Sloan Survey of Online Learning has just been released.  The research was conducted by Babson Survey Research Group and the College Board and funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.  The report is distributed by the Sloan Consortium.

The survey of over 2,500 colleges and universities shows that over 5.6 million students were enrolled in one or more online class during the fall semester of 2009.  This is the largest ever increase in students in a year-over-year comparison.

The key findings of the report are:

  • Other report findings include:
  • Almost two-thirds of for-profit institutions now say that online learning is a critical part of their long term strategy.
  • The 21%growth rate for online enrollments far exceeds the 2% growth in the overall higher education student population.
  • Nearly one-half of institutions report that the economic downturn has increased demand for face-to-face courses and programs.
  • Three-quarters of institutions report that the economic downturn has increased demand for online courses and programs.

The full report is available here.

Or, here: class-differences