Some Applications for Chickering and Gamson’s 7 Priciples In the Online Classroom

 

In 1987, Arthur W. Chickering and Zelda F. Gamson published their classic work entitled “Seven principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education.”  A. W. Bangert opined in a 2004 article that “The Seven Principles framework (Chickering and Gamson) offers solid, research guidance for the design and delivery of Internet courses.”

Principle 01: Encourages contacts between students and faculty.

  • Email response policy sets expectations for both student and instructor
  • Electronic office hours
  • Use a variety of communication tools in course (announcements, email, discussion, etc.)
  • Synchronous communication (chat, text, Skype, etc.)
  • Pictures or avatars for faculty and students

Continue reading “Some Applications for Chickering and Gamson’s 7 Priciples In the Online Classroom”

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Crews, Wilkinson, and Neill: Principles for Good Practice In Undergraduate Education: Effective Online Course Design to Assist Students’ Success

Crews, Tena B., Kelly Wilkinson, and Jason K. Neill.  “Principles for Good Practice In Undergraduate Education: Effective Online Course Design to Assist Students’ Success.” MERLOT Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, vol. 11, no. 1 (March 2015): 87-103.

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to apply the Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education (Chickering & Gamson, 1991) to online course design to enhance students’ success in an online course. A survey was created to determine students’ perception of strategies and skills they perceived as important to complete an online course. The survey was created based on behavioral learning, cognitive learning, and social learning frameworks. The responses of the 179 students in this study in an undergraduate Computer Applications in Business course at a large southeastern university were categorized by the Seven Principles. Results of the survey showed the course design strategies and what students valued matched well with the Seven Principles Implications of the study provide evidence that good course design embeds the seven principles to ensure students are successful in the online learning environment.

The journal article is available here: http://jolt.merlot.org/vol11no1/Crews_0315.pdf

Or, here: Crews_0315.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Pelz, “(My) Three Principles of Effective Online Pedagogy”

Bill Pelz, “(My) Three Principles of Effective Online Pedagogy.”  Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, Vol. 8, No. 3, June 2004.

Bill Pelz, of Herkimer County Community College,was a recipient of the 2003 Sloan-C award for Excellence in Online Teaching.  In this article he describes the specific techniques he uses for creating an online environment in which students do (most of) the work, collaborate on projects, and establish an online learning community. Provides many strategies for use in online courses.

The article is available from Sloan-C: http://sloanconsortium.org/sites/default/files/v8n3_pelz.pdf

And here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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“A Constructivist Approach to Online Training for Online Teachers”

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Sanford Gold.  “A Constructivist Approach to Online Training for Online Teachers.”  The Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, volume 5, number 1 (May 2001): 35-57.

Abstract:

This article examines the pedagogical role of the teacher in online education. Specifically, the transition from in-class room instruction to online instruction is a complex one involving specialized training in the technical aspects of delivering quality educational materials (or environments) to the students, and specialized training in how to foster knowledge acquisition within this new environment. The article focuses on the pedagogical training that an online instructor needs to become an effective teacher.

The article investigates a two-week faculty development pedagogical training course aimed at preparing teachers to operate effectively within an online educational environment. In attempting to orient the teacher to the online environment, the course used a constructivist instructional methodology within an online context. Several types of collaborative exercises were employed such as virtual field trips, online evaluations, interactive essays, and group projects.

The sample (N=44) represented veteran college teachers with little online teaching or studying experience. Tenured faculty (30%) and Instructors (25%) composed the majority of the class. The group had well over 13 years classroom teaching experience (53%), and over three-quarters are currently teaching in higher education institutions.

Hypotheses were tested through online data collection and surveys to find out the effects of the pedagogical training on the participants. One important finding of the study concludes that teachers exposed to the course significantly changed their attitudes toward online instruction seeing it as more participatory, and interactive than face-to-face instruction. Another major finding is that after the course, teachers saw the online medium as more of an extension of their faculty work. That is, faculty were more willing to use the online medium as an extension of their duties.

The full article is available here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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