Online Report Card: Tracking Online Education In the United States

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The 2015 Survey of Online Learning conducted by Babson Survey Research Group has been released.  This is their 13th annual report on online learning.  This year’s survey and report was co-sponsored by the Online Learning Consortium (OLC), Pearson, StudyPortals, WCET, and Tyton Partners.  Babson’s reports have become known as the “leading barometer of online learning in the United States.” (Previous reports are available here for 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, and 2007)

The key findings of the report include: Continue reading

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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125 Online Learning Innovations

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Contact North (Ontario’s Distance Education and Training Network) has published a booklet outlining 125 Online Learning Innovations covering these topics:

  • Educational Resources
  • Blended Learning
  • Student Engagement
  • Online Assessment
  • Planning
  • Faculty Development and Support
  • Online Support Services for Students

Each of these topics has information on what they call “Pockets of Innovation.”  These are largely case studies of innovation at various schools in North America.  Here is there description of the topics and the “pockets of innovation”:

THE POCKETS OF INNOVATION SERIES

Ontario’s 24 public colleges and 22 public universities are a hotbed of innovation in emerging technologies and online tools focused expanding and improving learning opportunities for students through online and blended learning innovations.

From 2011 through 2014, Contact North | Contact Nord visited innovators at public colleges and universities across Ontario to learn about their initiatives in online, blended, and technology-enabled learning.

The Pockets of Innovation Series showcases 125 ground-breaking projects focusing on transforming the learning experience for students, increasing excellence and productivity in the delivery of learning, enhancing engagement for students, and fostering innovation and creativity amongst students and faculty and instructors.

These ground-breaking projects are profiled on teachonline.ca and meet 3 specific criteria:

  1. They represent a new approach;
  2. They directly support students; and
  3. The developers are prepared to share what they’ve learned with other public colleges and universities in Ontario and the challenges they encountered.

In reviewing all 125 Pockets of Innovation, a series of 7 themes emerged showing where the colleges and universities are focusing their efforts at innovating in online learning.

The seven themes include:

Creating and Adapting Educational Resources

Under this theme, we uncover the innovative ways Ontario’s public colleges and universities developed and adapted a plethora of educational resources in a multitude of format to respond to student needs for access, alternative approaches to learning, information resources, applied learning opportunities, interaction, and new approaches to assessment.

Making the Most of Blended Learning

Under this theme, we uncover a striking diversity of models of blended learning at Ontario’s public colleges and universities with each approach suiting particular student groups and content.

Online Learning Focused on Student Engagement and Flexibility

Under this theme, we uncover examples of models and approaches to online learning in Ontario’s public colleges and universities built around new pedagogies that focus on student-centred learning and new roles for faculty.

• Enhancing Learning through Online Assessment

Under this theme, we uncover the creative approaches used by public colleges and universities to online assessment and evaluation for enhanced learning and higher grades.

• Planning for Online Learning

Under this theme, we uncover five-year plans, institutional strategic documents, and plans for technology-enhanced learning at Ontario’s public colleges and universities that feature online and/or blended learning as central to their mission and future.

• Faculty Development and Support

Under this theme, we uncover the myriad of opportunities Ontario’s public colleges and universities offer to faculty and instructors for training, support, and access to resources to facilitate their transition to online and blended learning and teaching.

• Innovative Online Support Services for Students

In the sections that follow, we uncover each of these seven themes in greater detail with specific examples of the innovative work taking place on our public college and university campuses.

The book is available for free from here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Grade Level: Tracking Online Education In the United States

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The 2014 Survey of Online Learning conducted by Babson Research Group, the Online Learning Consortium, Pearson, etc. was recently released.  One of the findings was that the number of higher education students who are taking at least one online course was up 3.7 percent over the previous year.  While that is slower growth than in the past, it still far exceeds the the overall growth rate of higher education in general.

The key findings are:

  • The year-to-year 3.7% increase in the number of distance education students is the lowest recorded over the 13 years of this report series.
  • Public and private nonprofit institutions recorded distance enrollment growth, but these were offset by a decrease among for-profit institutions.
  • The percent of academic leaders rating the learning outcomes in online education as the same or superior to those in face-to-face remained unchanged at 74.1%.
  • The proportion of chief academic leaders reporting online learning is critical to their long-term strategy reached a new high of 70.8%.
  • Only 28.0% of academic leaders say that their faculty accept the “value and legitimacy of online education.”
  • The adoption of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Course) is reaching a plateau, only 8.0% of higher education institutions currently offer one, another 5.6% report MOOCs are in the planning stages.
  • The proportion of academic leaders who believe that MOOCs represent a sustainable method for offering online courses dropped to 16.3%.

The press release is available here.

The infographic is available here.

The full report is available here: gradelevel

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Infographic: E-Learning Statistics You Need To Know For 2015

15 eLearning Statistics You Need to Know for 2015 Infographic
Find more education infographics on e-Learning Infographics

Continue reading

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Grade Change: Tracking Online Education In the United States

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The 2013 survey of online education administered by the Babson Survey Research Group has just recently been released.  The survey was conducted in conjunction with the Online Consortium and Pearson.

The survey aimed to answer the following questions:

  • Is Online Learning Strategic?
  • Are Learning Outcomes in Online Comparable to Face-to-Face Learning?
  • How Many Students are Learning Online?
  • How are Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) faring?
  • And much more…

And had these key findings:

  • 7.1 million of higher education students are taking at least one online course.
  • The 6.1 % growth rate represents over 400,000 additional students taking at least one online course.
  • The percent of academic leaders rating the learning outcomes in online education as the same or superior to those as in face-to-face instruction, grew from 57% in 2003 to 74% in 2013.
  • The number of students taking at least one online course continued to grow at a rate far in excess of overall enrollments, but the rate was the lowest in a decade.

The full survey is available here.

Or, here: gradechange

 

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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“Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Grading Rubric for Online Discussions”

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In the appendix, this article has copies of the original rubric and the revised rubric used for online discussions.  Each of them have the following 4 criteria:

  • Quantity
  • Quality
  • Timeliness
  • Communication Proficiency

The descriptions for the various levels of proficiency for each of the criterion are quite good.

Ann M. Sloan and Nikolaos.  “Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Grading Rubric for Online Discussions.”  MERLOT Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, volume 7, number 4 (December 2011).

The full article is available here.

 

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Faculty Focus: Student Persistence in Online Courses

Dr. Maryellen Weimer has a post over at Faculty Focus about understanding the key factors that affect student completion rates (persistence) in online courses.  She discusses Carolyn Hart’s article “Factors Associated With Student Persistence in an Online Program of Study: A Review of the Literature.”  This article is a review of 20 articles published on the subject since 1999. (Here is my post on the same article from last October.)

Weimer points out these factors affecting persistence from the article:

  1. Satisfaction with online learning
  2. A sense of belonging to a learning community
  3. Motivation
  4. Peer and family support
  5. Time management skills
  6. Increased communication with the instructor

The full post is available at Faculty Focus.

 

 

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United States

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The 2012 survey of online learning by the Babson Survey Group has recently been released.  The survey was conducted with the support of Sloan-C and Pearson.  The survey found that the number of students taking at least one online class has surpassed 6.7 million.  It also found that the adoption of Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs) is low with most institutions sitting on the sidelines.

According to the report online growth “remains extremely robust,” even in a time declining enrollments in higher education overall. With regards to MOOCs, they found, “Institutional opinions on MOOCs are mixed, with positive views of their ability to learn about online pedagogy and to attract new students, but concerns about whether they represent a sustainable method for offering courses.”

The key findings in the report are:

  • Over 6.7 million students were taking at least one online course during the fall 2011 term, an increase of 570,000 students over the previous year.
  • Thirty-two percent of higher education students now take at least one course online.
  • Only 2.6 percent of higher education institutions currently have a MOOC (Massive Open Online Course), another 9.4 percent report MOOCs are in the planning stages.
  • Academic leaders remain unconvinced that MOOCs represent a sustainable method for offering online courses, but do believe that they provide an important means for institutions to learn about online pedagogy.
  • Seventy-seven percent of academic leaders rate the learning outcomes in online education as the same or superior to those in face-to-face.
  • Only 30.2 percent of chief academic officers believe that their faculty accept the value and legitimacy of online education – a rate is lower than recorded in 2004.
  • The proportion of chief academic leaders that say that online learning is critical to their long-term strategy is at a new high of 69.1 percent.
  • A majority of chief academic officers at all types of institutions continue to believe that lower retention rates for online courses are a barrier to the wide-spread adoption of online education.

The report is availalbe here.

Or, here: changingcourse

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Going the Distance: Online Education in the United States

Going the Distance

The 2011 annual suvey conducted by Babson Survey Research Group and the College Board is now available.  The report was produced in conjunction with Sloan-C, Kaplan Univeristy, Inside Higher Ed, and Pearson.

The survey shows that the growth rate in online enrollments is ten times that rate in higher education in general.  The key findings of the report are:

  • Over 6.1 million students were taking at least one online course during the fall 2010 term, an increase of 560,000 students over the previous year.
  • The 10% growth rate for online enrollments far exceeds the 2% growth in the overall higher education student population.
  • Thirty-one percent of higher education students now take at least one course online.
  • Reported year-to-year enrollment changes for fully online programs by discipline show most are growing.
  • Academic leaders believe that the level of student satisfaction is equivalent for online and face-to-face courses.
  • 65% of higher education institutions now say that online learning is a critical part of their long-term strategy.
  • There continues to be a consistent minority of academic leaders concerned that the quality of online instruction is not equal to courses delivered face-to-face.

The full report is available here.

Or, here: goingthedistance

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Class Differences: Online Education in the United States 2010

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The 2010 Sloan Survey of Online Learning has just been released.  The research was conducted by Babson Survey Research Group and the College Board and funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.  The report is distributed by the Sloan Consortium.

The survey of over 2,500 colleges and universities shows that over 5.6 million students were enrolled in one or more online class during the fall semester of 2009.  This is the largest ever increase in students in a year-over-year comparison.

The key findings of the report are:

  • Other report findings include:
  • Almost two-thirds of for-profit institutions now say that online learning is a critical part of their long term strategy.
  • The 21%growth rate for online enrollments far exceeds the 2% growth in the overall higher education student population.
  • Nearly one-half of institutions report that the economic downturn has increased demand for face-to-face courses and programs.
  • Three-quarters of institutions report that the economic downturn has increased demand for online courses and programs.

The full report is available here.

Or, here: class-differences

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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